Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities Earns Silver Level Inspire Certification

Community Foundation of Jackson Hole recognized for producing ‘Old Bill’s Fun Run’ event using international best practice standards for social and environmental responsibility

 

EUGENE–September 6, 2017–Old Bill’s Fun Run, celebrating its 21st running on September 9, 2017 and produced by the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole, has earned Silver Level Inspire Certification from the Council for Responsible Sport (Council), an Oregon-based non-profit supporting and promoting sustainability in sports.

Inspire event status is awarded by invitation to events achieving multiple certifications from the Council, to recognize the legacy of their commitment to social and environmental sustainability and thoughtful resource management. Old Bill’s Fun Run first earned certification in 2012 and has retained its silver level status each year since.

“For years Old Bill’s has reduced, reused and recycled, both for environmental and budgetary reasons,” said Old Bill’s Coordinator Annie Riddell. “In 2012, Council for Responsible Sport certification gave us the opportunity to strategize, organize and codify our efforts. Given Old Bill’s leadership role in the philanthropic realm, it makes sense to also demonstrate leadership in terms of environmental sustainability.”

“What the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole has accomplished through this event is nothing shy of incredible, and that work extends to the 30-person volunteer Run Committee that ensures the event is as responsible as it is fun by using the sport industry standard for best environmental and social practices,” said Shelley Villalobos, Managing Director of the Council for Responsible Sport.

The Foundation gives out Old Bill’s Fun Run T-shirts made from 100% recycled materials and produced in the U.S., reduces waste sent to the landfill by using biodegradable plates, bowls and cutlery for food and beverage, sorts recyclable and compostable waste for processing and reuse, promotes biking and bussing to the event and much more.

A spirited volunteer engages visitors with information about recycling right at the 2016 Old Bill’s Fun Run

Inspire certified events are required to measure and report on sustainability performance indicators and expected to share their story with fellow event organizers. Inspire event organizers are also asked to mentor other events on aspects of their responsible sport program—a requirement Old Bill’s has met by working with the Community Foundation of Teton Valley on a waste management program for its Tin Cup Challenge. Other Inspire events include the PGA Tour’s Waste Management Phoenix Open, Credit Union Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Run, Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon, Eversource Hartford Marathon and the Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon.

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About Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities: The first event of its kind in the nation, the idea for Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities came from an anonymous couple that has pledged more than $10 million in matching funds over twenty-one years to encourage local philanthropy. Through the event, produced annually by the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole, the community has raised over $133 million to benefit local charities. In 2016, Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities raised $12.1 million for 221 local nonprofits with about 4,000 people running, walking or wheeling in the event.

About The Community Foundation of Jackson Hole: For 28 years, the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole has worked with donors and nonprofits to enrich all aspects of Teton County, Wyoming. The Foundation enables donors to establish personal philanthropic funds including donor advised, endowment, field of interest and legacy funds to facilitate their giving, makes grants to nonprofits and regularly convenes nonprofit professionals for training and stakeholder conversations.

2017 Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon Levels Up to Gold Certification

The 2017 Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon produced by Conqur Endurance Group has been awarded Gold Level Certification. The marathon earned credit on 46 of the best practice standards offered in the Council’s certification program for social and environmental responsibility at sporting events, up from the 36 criteria the Marathon met to gain Silver level certification in 2015.

At the 2017 event, a combined eight tons of clothing dropped near the starting line and leftover food from the finish area were donated to local organizations for redistribution to those in need.

Certification lasts two years and requires meeting or exceeding standards across five categories: planning and communications, procurement, resource management, access and equity and community legacy. Organizers met all the possible best practices in the access & equity category, and were lauded for working closely year-round with the Los Angeles based non-profit Students Run LA (SRLA) to promote active lifestyles to local at-risk high school students through the donation of 3,500 marathon entries annually, valued at over half a million dollars.

The event diverted 62 percent of waste generated from the landfill, up from 47 percent diversion reported in 2015. The bump can be attributed to increased collaboration with the multiple municipal jurisdictions along the marathon course including a pilot compost collection of banana peels and biodegradable service wares at the finish area with the City of Santa Monica. Also, a combined eight tons of clothing dropped near the starting line and leftover food from the finish area were donated to local organizations for redistribution to those in need.

“We’re honored to earn this certification and to be a part of this incredible movement,” stated Tracey Russell, Chief Executive of Conqur Endurance Group. “We remain dedicated to reducing our footprint while expanding the marathon’s impact both locally and globally.”

“The Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon is a catalyst for change,” said Stacey Embretson, Senior Director of Operations for Conqur. “We are constantly looking for ways to improve and to engage our athletes in new ways, so this is really just the beginning for us.”

Organizers are working with local non-profits and the City of Los Angeles to eliminate the use of single-use plastic water bottles in future years, as well as consider ways to reduce energy use and engage participants with issues important to the community.

The Council’s managing director, Shelley Villalobos, said “The Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon is dedicated to its own improvement year over year, and organizers have worked hard to educate themselves and make adjustments in their decision making to enhance the sustainability of the event. It’s encouraging to see such a major marathon embrace change so openly. This is the type of leadership that is so needed on a broader scale in the industry—the gold level certification reflects the work that’s been put in behind the commitment.”

Read Also: ‘Greening the LA Marathon’ Interview with sustainability manager Jamie Simon (Green Sports Blog)

About Conqur Endurance Group:

Conqur Endurance Group, a subsidiary of McCourt LP, creates world-class experiences that ignite passion in athletes and connect communities through the transformative power of sport. The Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon is among the largest marathons in the country with 24,000 participants, thousands of volunteers and hundreds of thousands of spectators. The “Stadium to the Sea” course, starting at Dodger Stadium and finishing near the Santa Monica Pier, is one of the most scenic in the world, taking runners on a tour of Los Angeles past every major landmark. In addition to the marquee event, Conqur Endurance Group produces the Pasadena Half Marathon & 5K at the Rose Bowl, the Santa Monica Classic 5K/10K and the LA BIG 5K. Conqur also owns and operates one of the largest marathon training programs in the U.S., the LA Road Runners. Through official charity programs and strategic partnerships, Conqur supports dozens of nonprofit partners; the most notable being Students Run LA, one of the foremost nonprofit youth running programs in the nation. For more information, please visit www.goconqur.com

2017 Men’s Final Four Championship Organizers Seek Certification for Social and Environmental Responsibility

EUGENE, March 30, 2017– As the surviving teams emerge from March Madness and get ready for the 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championships in Phoenix, Arizona, organizers are preparing to host what they hope will be the most social and environmentally responsible Final Four weekend ever.

The 2017 Phoenix Final Four Local Organizing Committee has built programming upon a baseline created with the NCAA, Houston Local Organizing Committee and City of Houston at last years’ Final Four, using the Council for Responsible Sport standards for certification; the 2016 event earned basic level certification. Phoenix organizers hope to achieve a higher level of certification at this years’ event, which is awarded after a robust review process that includes an on-site evaluation by the Council’s primary evaluation partner, Waste Management, and post-event reporting of performance on specific criteria.

“Phoenix is honored to host the Final Four in 2017 and is making the same commitment to sustainability that Houston and former host cities have made,” said Dawn Rogers, CEO of the 2017 Phoenix Final Four Local Organizing Committee. “We are working with an outstanding local committee to have a high waste diversion rate along with water and energy offsets. With our community working together under one banner, we’ll strive to ensure that Phoenix showcases the standard of excellence this iconic event deserves.”

“Waste Management is excited to continue utilizing our sustainable event management expertise and evaluate this year’s Final Four for the Council,” said Ben Mjolsness, Sustainability Associate with Waste Management and this year’s on-site evaluator. “The event organizers have put together a robust collection of programs focused on social and environmental initiatives. We are looking forward to seeing them all in action at this year’s Final Four tournament.”

Certification from the Council formally recognizes responsible practices at sporting events and is achieved by implementing best practices in each of five categories including planning and communications, procurement, resource management, access and equity, and community legacy.

Socially and environmentally responsible initiatives planned for the 2017 Phoenix Final Four include:

  • Attempting high rates of waste diversion from the landfill through signage and sorting of recyclable and compostable materials
  • Working with local partners such as Keep Phoenix Beautiful to repurpose signage, banners and other durable materials
  • Engaging volunteers and the public to show support and take action in their lives through the ‘Final Four Green Pledge’
  • Hosting 3,200 youth (18 & under) at the NCAA Final Four Dribble on Sunday, April 2 in downtown Phoenix where participants will receive a free t-shirt and Wilson basketball
  • The Phoenix Local Organizing Committee is providing 6,000 backpacks to 60 area schools in a partnership with NCAA Team Works
  • Engaging third grade students at 360 local schools in a literacy challenge geared to inspire reading and increase classroom achievement in partnership with ReadOnArizona and NCAA.
  • Opening the March Madness Music Festival to the public at no cost. The festival is at Margaret T. Hance Park featuring performances by top national musicians.

The Final Four basketball games will be played at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale. The fan festivities will be held in downtown Phoenix starting Friday, March 31 through Monday, April 3.

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Bike New York Solidifies Leadership in Responsible Event Production with TD Five Boro Bike Tour Gold

November 2, 2016—The Council for Responsible Sport (Council) announced today that the TD Five Boro Bike Tour hosted by Bike New York has earned gold level certification, recognizing the successful implementation of socially and environmentally responsible practices at the 2016 event. Held each year on the first Sunday in May in New York, more than 30,000 riders reclaim the streets of New York for a day to raise awareness and funds for Bike New York’s free bike education programs. This is the second certification of the event, which earned silver certification from the Council in 2014.

“Being able to turn the iconic TD Five Boro Bike Tour into a leader in the growing movement of social and environmental responsibility is certainly one of our finest achievements,” said Ken Podziba, President & CEO of Bike New York. “Reaching the Gold has been a real team effort,and we could not have done so without such committed partnerships from organizations and city agencies like GrowNYC and NYC Compost Project, and the support of our very green title sponsor, TD Bank. This certification encompasses everything we strive to be as an organization and as individuals; and I’d like to thank the Council for giving us this opportunity and for guiding us so brilliantly to do something that is so incredibly important for the environmental and social well-being of our planet.”

Bike New York 'Learn to Ride' Ambassadors got a free entry and helmet to share and promote BNY's bike education programs.

Bike New York ‘Learn to Ride’ Ambassadors got a free entry and helmet to share and promote BNY’s bike education programs.

Bike New York hosted an exemplary event in 2016 that brought to fruition dozens of initiatives that enhanced the responsibility of the event—think impacts, access, legacy—some were very visible (zero waste stations), while others were more subtle (waiving the helmet rule for a group of riders whose religious observations preclude helmet usage so that they could participate). All were done with the simple, effective intention to increase the social benefit to people while reducing negative environmental impacts.

 

Highlights from the 2016 TD Five Boro Bike Tour responsible sport initiatives include:

  • Through partnerships with Grow NYC and NYC Compost Project, Zero Waste Stations were used at Bike Expo New York, Tour Rest Areas, and at the Finish Festival to divert 91% of event waste from the landfill, including composting 6,000 lbs. of food waste.
  • Green Team volunteers managed the Zero Waste Stations, ensuring that participants followed signage to place waste in the proper recycling, compost, and waste receptacles.
  • 29,000 lbs. of leftover food was donated to City Harvest.
  • Seventy percent of the food provided at the Tour was organic or locally sourced, including 24,000 apples from the New York State Apple Association and 90,000 Clif products including, Clif Bars, Clif Organic Energy Food, and Clif Bloks.
  • Used bike tubes were collected at Rest Area Bike Repair Stations to be upcycled into wallets and messenger bags.
  • The Tour program was produced on paper that was sourced in an environmentally friendly, socially responsible, and economically viable manner, through the Forest Stewardship Council program.
  • 10,000 Tyvek rider bibs were recycled through post-Tour collection efforts.
  • The Start Line and Bike Expo New York were in transit-dense locations, making the events easily accessible by all.
  • Through a partnership with DEP’s NYC Water Program, world-renowned New York City tap water was available for riders, eliminating the need for disposable water bottles.
  • With support from Clif Bar, more than 20,000 foil-lined food wrappers (otherwise bound for the landfill) were collected for upcycling through a program run by Terracycle.
  • The Tour and the Bike Expo New York were ADA Accessible.
  • Proceeds from the Tour fund Bike New York’s free bike education programs for kids and adults. In 2015, Bike New York taught more than 17,000 New Yorkers how to ride safely and confidently.
  • Outreach Teams engaged with NYC Community Boards in the Tour planning process, promoted Bike New York’s free bike education programs in their districts, and encouraged community members to participate in the Tour as riders, volunteers, or spectators.
  • TD Bank sponsored performers along the route, many of who operate as non-profit organizations.
  • TD Bank provided electricity from their branches, which comes from Green Mountain Energy, a renewable energy company, to power the performances along the route.

 

See what we mean? This is an event to celebrate, and to ride if you can! You can read the full press release here

and check out more information about the TD Five Boro Bike Tour here.

10th Annual Eugene Marathon Earns Gold in Oregon

Newly Certified at the Gold level by the Council for Responsible Sport, the run set and achieved new sustainability goals

The Council announced today that the 2016 Eugene Marathon, Half Marathon and 5K held May 3 in Eugene, Oregon proved its commitment to producing a world-class event in a socially and environmentally responsible way by achieving gold level certification. This was the first time organizers sought certification for the marathon. CRS_Gold_logo

“Earning such an impressive award shows how dedicated the Eugene Marathon and its participants are to taking care of the environment and our community,” said Richard Maher, Eugene Marathon race director. “Large events like ours have a responsibility to leave places better than we found them.”

The Marathon used 100% renewable energy, provided reusable water bottles and filling stations, diverted or repurposed over 40% of event waste and generated more than $1.3 million in positive economic impact to Eugene and Springfield. Read more about specific sustainability initiatives at the race here.

Read the full press release here and join us in congratulating the Eugene Marathon on a job very well done!